Saturday, June 13, 2009

Enoshima Revisited Part 1: The Beast..

I've posted about Enoshima a few times, and it must be said that I am a fan, but while on a visit just a few weeks back I was amazed by the amount of seaweed and garbage that piles up on the beach. Sure there's a lot of other stuff to take your mind off it but damn, that's a whole lot of gomi..













8 comments:

Matus said...

And the people are bathing there?? What??

weevideo said...

It looks more like the garbage dump near my house. I can't believe there are still ppl visiting.. super dirty.

MKL said...

I must say I'd never expect this.

Cool blog, btw :)

Anonymous said...

I used to live at Enoshima and you have to be kidding yourself if you think a little 'sprucing up' by the government will make it into another Bondi. I think what you left out was that the sand is black and coarse which makes it very unattractive. The water quality varies from day to day but you have to remember that it is very close to to the largest industrial port in Japan (kawasaki). There are organised beach cleaning groups that clean on a regular basis.

Richard said...

Your blog has made the Sydney Morning Herald in Australia.

I visited Enoshima a few years ago, and though the beach was pretty nondescript (compared to Aussie beaches :-), I really liked Enoshima island and the views of Fuji-san.

Seaweed I could understand, but the trash - and people still bathing around it - beggars belief. I'm very surprised that the local government authority isn't at least removing this stuff every day, astounded that Japanese people are actively contributing to it.

Hopefully the publicity will be a wake up call for everyone concerned.

hepkess said...

Japan is caught in the currents between Korea on the West, and in the Northeast, a current that sweeps the same water, garbage and junk to the same places. It isn't like other coasts where things are washed in and out. Most of the junk you see is not from Japan, but from other parts of Asia. Now, I think it is 90% Korean. It is not that it is planned that way, it unfortunatly happens that way.

Jeffrey said...

I'm surprised they don't use a "beach sweeper" there every night as they do at Waikiki. I might not work for the crap down at the tide line, but it would otherwise tidy up the mess left behind up in the sand.

That stuff looks as if it had been churned up by a storm. Had there been a typhoon recently?

I've never understood why Japanese tolerate so much trash in public places, particularly in parks, beaches and the like.

Melonade said...

There actually had been a typhoon in the couple of days previous, which is why a lot of the stuff had washed up. I always loved going to Enoshima, for all it's trash t here was so much to love..